KĀMA SUTTA (SENSUAL PLEASURES)

The Suttanipāta IV The Chapter of Octads

1 SENSUAL PLEASURES ( KĀMA SUTTA )

  1. [151] When a mortal desires sensual pleasure,
    if that succeeds for him,
    surely he is elated in mind,
    having gained what he desires. (1)
  2. But when, full of sensual desire,
    a person is aroused by desire,
    if those sensual pleasures decline,
    he is afflicted as if pierced by a dart. (2)
  3. One who avoids sensual pleasures
    like a serpent’s head with the foot,
    being mindful, overcomes
    this attachment to the world. (3)
  4. Fields, land, or bullion,
    cattle and horses, slaves and servants,
    women, relatives — when a person greedily
    longs for various sensual pleasures, (4)
  5. even the weak overpower him;
    obstacles crush him.
    Then suffering enters him
    as water does a broken boat. (5)
  6. Therefore, ever mindful, a person
    should avoid sensual pleasures.
    Having abandoned them, one can cross the flood,
    as by bailing out the boat one can reach the far shore. (6)

6 OLD AGE (JARĀ SUTTA)

  1. Short, alas, is this life;
    one even dies before a hundred years.
    Even if one lives longer,
    one still dies because of old age. (1)
  2. People sorrow over things taken as “mine,”
    for there are no permanent possessions.
    Having seen that there is separation,
    one should not live the home life. (2)
  3. Whatever a person conceives thus, “This is mine,”
    that too is abandoned at death.
    Having understood this, a wise one, my follower,
    should not incline to take things as “mine.” (3)
  4. Just as, on awakening, a person does not see
    whatever was encountered in a dream, [159]
    so too one does not see a beloved person
    who has died and passed away. (4)
  5. Although those people were seen and heard,
    and were known by such and such a name,
    when a person has passed away,
    the name alone remains to be uttered. (5)
  6. Those who are greedy for personal assets
    do not escape sorrow, lamentation, and miserliness.
    Therefore the munis, seers of security,
    wandered having abandoned possessions. (6)
  7. When a bhikkhu lives withdrawn,
    resorting to a secluded seat,
    they say it is appropriate for him
    not to show himself in a fixed dwelling. (7)
  8. The muni is not dependent on anything;
    he takes nothing as pleasing, nothing as displeasing.
    Lamentation and miserliness do not stick to him
    as water does not stick to a leaf. (8)
  9. Just as a water drop does not stick to a lotus leaf,
    or water to the lotus flower,
    so the muni does not cling to anything
    among the seen, heard, or sensed. (9) [160]
  10. One cleansed does not thereby conceive
    things seen, heard, or sensed.
    He does not wish for purification by another,
    for he becomes neither passionate nor dispassionate. (10)

I The Chapter on the Serpent

1 THE SERPENT (URAGA SUTTA)

  1. One who removes the anger that has arisen
    as one removes with herbs a snake’s spreading venom:
    that bhikkhu gives up the here and the beyond
    as a serpent sheds its old worn-out skin. (1)
  2. One who has entirely cut off lust
    as if plucking a lotus growing in a lake:
    that bhikkhu gives up the here and the beyond
    as a serpent sheds its old worn-out skin. (2)
  3. One who has entirely cut off craving,
    having dried up its fast-flowing stream:
    that bhikkhu gives up the here and the beyond
    as a serpent sheds its old worn-out skin. (3)
  4. One who has entirely swept up conceit
    as a great flood does a fragile bridge of reeds:
    that bhikkhu gives up the here and the beyond
    as a serpent sheds its old worn-out skin. (4)
  5. One who finds no core in states of existence,
    as one seeking flowers in udumbara trees finds none:
    that bhikkhu gives up the here and the beyond
    as a serpent sheds its old worn-out skin. (5)
  6. One who has no irritations inwardly,
    having transcended such and such states of existence:
    that bhikkhu gives up the here and the beyond
    as a serpent sheds its old worn-out skin. (6) [2]
  7. One whose thoughts have been burned out,
    entirely well excised internally:
    that bhikkhu gives up the here and the beyond
    as a serpent sheds its old worn-out skin. (7)
  8. One who has neither run too far nor run back,
    who has transcended all this proliferation:
    that bhikkhu gives up the here and the beyond
    as a serpent sheds its old worn-out skin. (8)
  9. One who has neither run too far nor run back,
    having known about the world, “All this is unreal”:
    that bhikkhu gives up the here and the beyond
    as a serpent sheds its old worn-out skin. (9)
  10. One who has neither run too far nor run back,
    devoid of greed, [knowing] “All this is unreal”:
    that bhikkhu gives up the here and the beyond
    as a serpent sheds its old worn-out skin. (10)
  11. One who has neither run too far nor run back,
    devoid of lust, [knowing] “All this is unreal”:
    that bhikkhu gives up the here and the beyond
    as a serpent sheds its old worn-out skin. (11)
  12. One who has neither run too far nor run back,
    devoid of hatred, [knowing] “All this is unreal”:
    that bhikkhu gives up the here and the beyond
    as a serpent sheds its old worn-out skin. (12)
  13. One who has neither run too far nor run back,
    devoid of delusion, [knowing] “All this is unreal”:
    that bhikkhu gives up the here and the beyond
    as a serpent sheds its old worn-out skin. (13)
  14. One who has no latent tendencies at all,
    whose unwholesome roots have been uprooted:
    that bhikkhu gives up the here and the beyond
    as a serpent sheds its old worn-out skin. (14)
  15. One who has no states born from distress
    as a condition for returning to the near shore:
    that bhikkhu gives up the here and the beyond
    as a serpent sheds its old worn-out skin. (15)
  16. One who has no states born from desire,
    causes for bondage to existence:
    that bhikkhu gives up the here and the beyond
    as a serpent sheds its old worn-out skin. (16) [3]
  17. Having abandoned the five hindrances,
    untroubled, crossed over perplexity, free of darts:
    that bhikkhu gives up the here and the beyond
    as a serpent sheds its old worn-out skin. (17)

two types of tanha

It appears all of the Pali suttas refer to 3 type of craving namely kama tanha ,bhava tanha and vibhava tanha, such as the 1st sermon (SN 56.11). 
However , the parallel of different traditions ie T14 & T52 shows that there are actually 2 type of craving taught by the Buddha ie kama tanha and bhava tanha .

DN15
“It was said: ‘In dependence upon craving there is pursuit.’ How that is so, Ānanda, should be understood in this way: If there were absolutely and utterly no craving of any kind anywhere—that is, no craving for sense pleasures, craving for existence, or craving for non-existence—then, in the complete absence of craving, with the cessation of craving, would pursuit be discerned?”

Certainly not, venerable sir.”

“Therefore, Ānanda, this is the cause, source, origin, and condition for pursuit, namely, craving.

“Thus, Ānanda, these two phenomena, being a duality, converge into a unity in feeling .

T14 佛說人本欲生經
「如是,阿難!從是有、從是本、從是習、從是因緣,有愛故令有求,求故令有愛。彼,阿難!欲愛亦有愛。是二皆痛相會,有痛因緣

T52 佛說大生義經
所謂欲愛、有愛,由此二法生諸過失。阿難!當知此愛法者,即虛妄法而不究竟,此集此因此生此緣得起取法,由是取法亦不究竟。

The Pali Canon translation available on the 5 th century . Whereas the parallel translated by An Shi Gao was living in the 2 nd century , much more earlier than nikaya . An Shi Gao was an early Buddhist missionary to China, and the earliest known translator of Indian Buddhist texts into Chinese. (Wikipedia)
Born: Ctesiphon, Iraq
Died: 168 AD, Suzhou, China

Therefore , at least , one should able to know the parallel at that time does not have the vibhava tanha . It should be a late works . An addition .

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