Satipaṭṭhāna Sutta

All Our Practice Efforts, Directed to the Cessation of the Taints


所有修行努力,导向诸漏尽

Satipaṭṭhāna Sutta

念處經

The Foundations of Mindfulness

 1. THUS HAVE I HEARD. On one occasion the Blessed One was living in the Kuru country where there was a town of the Kurus named Kammāsadhamma. There he addressed the bhikkhus thus: “Bhikkhus.”—“Venerable sir,” they replied. The Blessed One said this:

 2. “Bhikkhus, this is the direct path for the purification of beings [56], for the surmounting of sorrow and lamentation, for the disappearance of pain and grief, for the attainment of the true way, for the realisation of Nibbāna—namely, the four foundations of mindfulness.

 3. “What are the four? Here, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu abides contemplating the body as a body, ardent, fully aware, and mindful, having put away covetousness and grief for the world. He abides contemplating feelings as feelings, ardent, fully aware, and mindful, having put away covetousness and grief for the world. He abides contemplating mind as mind, ardent, fully aware, and mindful, having put away covetousness and grief for the world. He abides contemplating mind-objects as mind-objects, ardent, fully aware, and mindful, having put away covetousness and grief for the world.

(CONTEMPLATION OF THE BODY)

 (1. Mindfulness of Breathing)

 4. “And how, bhikkhus, does a bhikkhu abide contemplating the body as a body? Here a bhikkhu, gone to the forest or to the root of a tree or to an empty hut, sits down; having folded his legs crosswise, set his body erect, and established mindfulness in front of him, ever mindful he breathes in, mindful he breathes out. Breathing in long, he understands: ‘I breathe in long’; or breathing out long, he understands: ‘I breathe out long.’ Breathing in short, he understands: ‘I breathe in short’; or breathing out short, he understands: ‘I breathe out short.’ He trains thus: ‘I shall breathe in experiencing the whole body’; he trains thus: ‘I shall breathe out experiencing the whole body.’ He trains thus: ‘I shall breathe in tranquillising the bodily formation’; he trains thus: ‘I shall breathe out tranquillising the mation’ ; he trains thus: ‘I shall breathe out tranquillising the bodily formation.’ Just as a skilled lathe-operator or his apprentice, when making a long turn, understands: ‘I make a long turn’; or, when making a short turn, understands: ‘I make a short turn’; so too, breathing in long, a bhikkhu understands: ‘I breathe in long’…he trains thus: ‘I shall breathe out tranquillising the bodily formation.’

(INSIGHT)

 5. “In this way he abides contemplating the body as a body internally, or he abides contemplating the body as a body externally, or he abides contemplating the body as a body both internally and externally. Or else he abides contemplating in the body its nature of arising, or he abides contemplating in the body its nature of vanishing, or he abides contemplating in the body its nature of both arising and vanishing. Or else mindfulness that ‘there is a body’ is simply established in him to the extent necessary for bare knowledge and mindfulness. And he abides independent, not clinging to anything in the world. That is how a bhikkhu abides contemplating the body as a body.

 (2. The Four Postures)

6. “Again, bhikkhus, when walking, a bhikkhu understands: ‘I am walking’; when standing, he understands: ‘I am standing’; when sitting, [57] he understands: ‘I am sitting’; when lying down, he understands: ‘I am lying down’; or he understands accordingly however his body is disposed.

 7. “In this way he abides contemplating the body as a body internally, externally, and both internally and externally…And he abides independent, not clinging to anything in the world. That too is how a bhikkhu abides contemplating the body as a body.

 (3. Full Awareness)

 8. “Again, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu is one who acts in full awareness when going forward and returning; who acts in full awareness when looking ahead and looking away; who acts in full awareness when flexing and extending his limbs; who acts in full awareness when wearing his robes and carrying his outer robe and bowl; who acts in full awareness when eating, drinking, consuming food, and tasting; who acts in full awareness when defecating and urinating; who acts in full awareness when walking, standing, sitting, falling asleep, waking up, talking, and keeping silent.

 9. “In this way he abides contemplating the body as a body internally, externally, and both internally and externally… And he abides independent, not clinging to anything in the world. That too is how a bhikkhu abides contemplating the body as a body.

 (4. Foulness—The Bodily Parts)

 10. “Again, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu reviews this same body up from the soles of the feet and down from the top of the hair, bounded by skin, as full of many kinds of impurity thus: ‘In this body there are head-hairs, body-hairs, nails, teeth, skin, flesh, sinews, bones, bone-marrow, kidneys, heart, liver, diaphragm, spleen, lungs, intestines, mesentery, contents of the stomach, feces, bile, phlegm, pus, blood, sweat, fat, tears, grease, spittle, snot, oil of the joints, and urine.’ Just as though there were a bag with an opening at both ends full of many sorts of grain, such as hill rice, red rice, beans, peas, millet, and white rice, and a man with good eyes were to open it and review it thus: ‘This is hill rice, this is red rice, these are beans, these are peas, this is millet, this is white rice’; so too, a bhikkhu reviews this same body…as full of many kinds of impurity thus: ‘In this body there are head-hairs…and urine.’

 11. “In this way he abides contemplating the body as a body internally, externally, and both internally and externally… And he abides independent, not clinging to anything in the world. That too is how a bhikkhu abides contemplating the body as a body.

 (5. Elements)

 12. “Again, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu reviews this same body, however it is placed, however disposed, by way of elements thus: ‘In this body there are the earth element, the water element, the fire element, and the air element.’  Just as though a skilled butcher or his apprentice had killed a cow and was seated at the crossroads with it cut up into pieces; so too, a bhikkhu reviews this same body…by way of elements thus: ‘In this body there are the earth element, the water element, the fire element, and the air element.’

 13. “In this way he abides contemplating the body as a body internally, externally, and both internally and externally…And he abides independent, not clinging to anything in the world. That too is how a bhikkhu abides contemplating the body as a body.

 (6–14. The Nine Charnel Ground Contemplations)

 14. “Again, bhikkhus, as though he were to see a corpse thrown aside in a charnel ground, one, two, or three days dead, bloated, livid, and oozing matter, a bhikkhu compares this same body with it thus: ‘This body too is of the same nature, it will be like that, it is not exempt from that fate.’

15. “In this way he abides contemplating the body as a body internally, externally, and both internally and externally…And he abides independent, not clinging to anything in the world. That too is how a bhikkhu abides contemplating the body as a body.

 16. “Again, as though he were to see a corpse thrown aside in a charnel ground, being devoured by crows, hawks, vultures, dogs, jackals, or various kinds of worms, a bhikkhu compares this same body with it thus: ‘This body too is of the same nature, it will be like that, it is not exempt from that fate.’

 17. “…That too is how a bhikkhu abides contemplating the body as a body.

 18–24. “Again, as though he were to see a corpse thrown aside in a charnel ground, a skeleton with flesh and blood, held together with sinews…a fleshless skeleton smeared with blood, held together with sinews…a skeleton without flesh and blood, held together with sinews…disconnected bones scattered in all directions—here a hand-bone, there a foot-bone, here a shin-bone, there a thigh-bone, here a hip-bone, there a back-bone, here a rib-bone, there a breast-bone, here an arm-bone, there a shoulder-bone, here a neck-bone, there a jaw-bone, here a tooth, there the skull—a bhikkhu compares this same body with it thus: ‘This body too is of the same nature, it will be like that, it is not exempt from that fate.’

 25. “…That too is how a bhikkhu abides contemplating the body as a body.

 26–30. “Again, as though he were to see a corpse thrown aside in a charnel ground, bones bleached white, the colour of shells… bones heaped up…bones more than a year old, rotted and crumbled to dust, a bhikkhu compares this same body with it thus: ‘This body too is of the same nature, it will be like that, it is not exempt from that fate.’

(INSIGHT)

 31. “In this way he abides contemplating the body as a body internally, or he abides contemplating the body as a body externally, or he abides contemplating the body as a body both internally and externally. Or else he abides contemplating in the body its nature of arising, or he abides contemplating in the body its nature of vanishing, or he abides contemplating in the body its nature of both arising and vanishing. Or else mindfulness that ‘there is a body’ is simply established in him to the extent necessary for bare knowledge and mindfulness. And he abides independent, not clinging to anything in the world. That too is how a bhikkhu abides contemplating the body as a body.

 (CONTEMPLATION OF FEELING)

 32. “And how, bhikkhus, does a bhikkhu abide contemplating feelings as feelings? Here, when feeling a pleasant feeling, a bhikkhu understands: ‘I feel a pleasant feeling’; when feeling a painful feeling, he understands: ‘I feel a painful feeling’; when feeling a neither-painful-nor-pleasant feeling, he understands: ‘I feel a neither-painful-nor-pleasant feeling.’ When feeling a worldly pleasant feeling, he understands: ‘I feel a worldly pleasant feeling’; when feeling an unworldly pleasant feeling, he understands: ‘I feel an unworldly pleasant feeling’; when feeling a worldly painful feeling, he understands: ‘I feel a worldly painful feeling’; when feeling an unworldly painful feeling, he understands: ‘I feel an unworldly painful feeling’; when feeling a worldly neither-painful-nor-pleasant feeling, he understands: ‘I feel a worldly neither-painful-nor-pleasant feeling’; when feeling an unworldly neither-painful-nor-pleasant feeling, he understands: ‘I feel an unworldly neither-painful-nor-pleasant feeling.’

 (INSIGHT)

 33. “In this way he abides contemplating feelings as feelings internally, or he abides contemplating feelings as feelings externally, or he abides contemplating feelings as feelings both internally and externally. Or else he abides contemplating in feelings their nature of arising, or he abides contemplating in feelings their nature of vanishing, or he abides contemplating in feelings their nature of both arising and vanishing. Or else mindfulness that ‘there is feeling’ is simply established in him to the extent necessary for bare knowledge and mindfulness. And he abides independent, not clinging to anything in the world. That is how a bhikkhu abides contemplating feelings as feelings.

 (CONTEMPLATION OF MIND)

 34. “And how, bhikkhus, does a bhikkhu abide contemplating mind as mind? Here a bhikkhu understands mind affected by lust as mind affected by lust, and mind unaffected by lust as mind unaffected by lust. He understands mind affected by hate as mind affected by hate, and mind unaffected by hate as mind unaffected by hate. He understands mind affected by delusion as mind affected by delusion, and mind unaffected by delusion as mind unaffected by delusion. He understands contracted mind as contracted mind, and distracted mind as distracted mind. He understands exalted mind as exalted mind, and unexalted mind as unexalted mind. He understands surpassed mind as surpassed mind, and unsurpassed mind as unsurpassed mind. He understands concentrated mind as concentrated mind, and unconcentrated mind as unconcentrated mind. He understands liberated mind as liberated mind, and unliberated mind as unliberated mind.

(INSIGHT)

 35. “In this way he abides contemplating mind as mind internally, or he abides contemplating mind as mind externally, or he abides contemplating mind as mind both internally and externally. Or else he abides contemplating in mind its nature of arising, [60] or he abides contemplating in mind its nature of vanishing, or he abides contemplating in mind its nature of both arising and vanishing. Or else mindfulness that ‘there is mind’ is simply established in him to the extent necessary for bare knowledge and mindfulness. And he abides independent, not clinging to anything in the world. That is how a bhikkhu abides contemplating mind as mind.

(CONTEMPLATION OF MIND-OBJECTS)

 (1. The Five Hindrances)

 36. “And how, bhikkhus, does a bhikkhu abide contemplating mind-objects as mind-objects? Here a bhikkhu abides contemplating mind-objects as mind-objects in terms of the five hindrances. And how does a bhikkhu abide contemplating mind-objects as mind-objects in terms of the five hindrances? Here, there being sensual desire in him, a bhikkhu understands: ‘There is sensual desire in me’; or there being no sensual desire in him, he understands: ‘There is no sensual desire in me’; and he also understands how there comes to be the arising of unarisen sensual desire, and how there comes to be the abandoning of arisen sensual desire, and how there comes to be the future non-arising of abandoned sensual desire.’

“There being ill will in him…There being sloth and torpor in him…There being restlessness and remorse in him…There being doubt in him, a bhikkhu understands: ‘There is doubt in me’; or there being no doubt in him, he understands: ‘There is no doubt in me’; and he understands how there comes to be the arising of unarisen doubt, and how there comes to be the abandoning of arisen doubt, and how there comes to be the future non-arising of abandoned doubt.

 (INSIGHT)

 37. “In this way he abides contemplating mind-objects as mind-objects internally, or he abides contemplating mind-objects as mind-objects externally, or he abides contemplating mind-objects as mind-objects both internally and externally. Or else he abides contemplating in mind-objects their nature of arising, or he abides contemplating in mind-objects their nature of vanishing, or he abides contemplating in mind-objects their nature of both arising and vanishing. Or else mindfulness that ‘there are mind-objects’ is simply established in him to the extent necessary for bare knowledge and mindfulness. And he abides independent, not clinging to anything in the world. That is how a bhikkhu abides contemplating mind-objects as mind-objects in terms of the five hindrances.

 (2. The Five Aggregates)

38. “Again, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu abides contemplating mind-objects as mind-objects in terms of the five aggregates affected by clinging. And how does a bhikkhu abide contemplating mind-objects as mind-objects in terms of the five aggregates affected by clinging? Here a bhikkhu understands: ‘Such is material form, such its origin, such its disappearance; such is feeling, such its origin, such its disappearance; such is perception, such its origin, such its disappearance; such are the formations, such their origin, such their disappearance; such is consciousness, such its origin, such its disappearance.’

 39. “In this way he abides contemplating mind-objects as mind-objects internally, externally, and both internally and externally…And he abides independent, not clinging to anything in the world. That is how a bhikkhu abides contemplating mind-objects as mind-objects in terms of the five aggregates affected by clinging.

 (3. The Six Bases)

40. “Again, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu abides contemplating mind-objects as mind-objects in terms of the six internal and external bases. And how does a bhikkhu abide contemplating mind-objects as mind-objects in terms of the six internal and external bases? Here a bhikkhu understands the eye, he understands forms, and he understands the fetter that arises dependent on both; and he also understands how there comes to be the arising of the unarisen fetter, and how there comes to be the abandoning of the arisen fetter, and how there comes to be the future non-arising of the abandoned fetter.

 “He understands the ear, he understands sounds…He understands the nose, he understands odours…He understands the tongue, he understands flavours…He understands the body, he understands tangibles…He understands the mind, he understands mind-objects, and he understands the fetter that arises dependent on both; and he also understands how there comes to be the arising of the unarisen fetter, and how there comes to be the abandoning of the arisen fetter, and how there comes to be the future non-arising of the abandoned fetter.

 41. “In this way he abides contemplating mind-objects as mind-objects internally, externally, and both internally and externally…And he abides independent, not clinging to anything in the world. That is how a bhikkhu abides contemplating mind-objects as mind-objects in terms of the six internal and external bases.

 (4. The Seven Enlightenment Factors)

 42. “Again, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu abides contemplating mind-objects as mind-objects in terms of the seven enlightenment factors. And how does a bhikkhu abide contemplating mind-objects as mind-objects in terms of the seven enlightenment factors? Here, there being the mindfulness enlightenment factor in him, a bhikkhu understands: ‘There is the mindfulness enlightenment factor in me’; or there being no mindfulness enlightenment factor in him, he understands: ‘There is no mindfulness enlightenment factor in me’; and he also understands how there comes to be the arising of the unarisen mindfulness enlightenment factor, and how the arisen mindfulness enlightenment factor comes to fulfilment arisen mindfulness enlightenment factor comes to fulfilment by development.

“There being the investigation-of-states enlightenment factor in him…There being the energy enlightenment factor in him…There being the rapture enlightenment factor in him…There being the tranquillity enlightenment factor in him…There being the concentration enlightenment factor in him…There being the equanimity enlightenment factor in him, a bhikkhu understands: ‘There is the equanimity enlightenment factor in me’; or there being no equanimity enlightenment factor in him, he understands: ‘There is no equanimity enlightenment factor in me’; and he also understands how there comes to be the arising of the unarisen equanimity enlightenment factor, and how the arisen equanimity enlightenment factor comes to fulfilment by development.

 43. “In this way he abides contemplating mind-objects as mind-objects internally, externally, and both internally and externally…And he abides independent, not clinging to anything in the world. That is how a bhikkhu abides contemplating mind-objects as mind-objects in terms of the seven enlightenment factors.

 (5. The Four Noble Truths)

44. “Again, bhikkhus, a bhikkhu abides contemplating mind-objects as mind-objects in terms of the Four Noble Truths. And how does a bhikkhu abide contemplating mind-objects as mind-objects in terms of the Four Noble Truths? Here a bhikkhu understands as it actually is: ‘This is suffering’; he understands as it actually is: ‘This is the origin of suffering’; he understands as it actually is: ‘This is the cessation of suffering’; he understands as it actually is: ‘This is the way leading to the cessation of suffering.’

(INSIGHT)

 45. “In this way he abides contemplating mind-objects as mind-objects internally, or he abides contemplating mind-objects as mind-objects externally, or he abides contemplating mind-objects as mind-objects both internally and externally. Or else he abides contemplating in mind-objects their nature of arising, or he abides contemplating in mind-objects their nature of vanishing, or he abides contemplating in mind-objects their nature of both arising and vanishing. Or else mindfulness that ‘there are mind-objects’ is simply established in him to the extent necessary for bare knowledge and mindfulness. And he abides independent, not clinging to anything in the world. That is how a bhikkhu abides contemplating mind-objects as mind-objects in terms of the Four Noble Truths.

(CONCLUSION)

 46. “Bhikkhus, if anyone should develop these four foundations of mindfulness in such a way for seven years, one of two fruits could be expected for him: either final knowledge here and now, or if there is a trace of clinging left, non-return.

 “Let alone seven years, bhikkhus. If anyone should develop these four foundations of mindfulness in such a way for six years…for five years…for four years…for three years…for two years…for one year, one of two fruits could be expected for him: either final knowledge here and now, or if there is a trace of clinging left, non-return.

 “Let alone one year, bhikkhus. If anyone should develop these four foundations of mindfulness in such a way for seven months…for six months…for five months…for four months…for three months…for two months…for one month…for half a month, one of two fruits could be expected for him: either final knowledge here and now, or if there is a trace of clinging left, non-return.

 “Let alone half a month, bhikkhus. If anyone should develop these four foundations of mindfulness in such a way for seven days, one of two fruits could be expected for him: either final knowledge here and now, or if there is a trace of clinging left, non-return.

 47. “So it was with reference to this that it was said: ‘Bhikkhus, this is the direct path for the purification of beings, for the surmounting of sorrow and lamentation, for the disappearance of pain and grief, for the attainment of the true way, for the realisation of Nibbāna—namely, the four foundations of mindfulness.’”

That is what the Blessed One said. The bhikkhus were satisfied and delighted in the Blessed One’s words.

中阿含98經/念處經(因品)
  如是我聞: 一時,佛遊拘樓國(kuru),在劍磨瑟曇拘樓都邑(Kammasadhamma)。 爾時,世尊告諸比丘: 
  「有一道,淨眾生,度憂畏,滅苦惱,斷啼哭,得正法,謂:四念處。若有過去諸如來、無所著、等正覺悉斷五蓋:心穢、慧羸,立心正住於四念處,修七覺支,得覺無上正盡之覺;若有未來諸如來、無所著、等正覺悉斷五蓋:心穢、慧羸,立心正住於四念處,修七覺支,得覺無上正盡之覺;我今現在如來、無所著、等正覺,我亦斷五蓋:心穢、慧羸,立心正住於四念處,修七覺支,得覺無上正盡之覺。 
  云何為四?觀身如身念處,觀覺如覺念處,觀心如心念處,觀法如法念處。 
  云何觀身如身念處?比丘者,行則知行,住則知住,坐則知坐,臥則知臥,眠則知眠,寤則知寤,眠寤則知眠寤。如是,比丘觀內身如身,觀外身如身,立念在身,有知有見,有明有達,是謂:比丘觀身如身。 
  復次,比丘觀身如身:比丘者,正知出入,善觀分別,屈伸低仰,儀容庠序,善著僧伽梨及諸衣鉢,行、住、坐、臥、眠、寤、語、默皆正知之。如是,比丘觀內身如身,觀外身如身,立念在身,有知有見,有明有達,是謂:比丘觀身如身。 
  復次,比丘觀身如身:比丘者,生惡不善念,以善法念治斷滅止,猶木工師、木工弟子,彼持墨繩,用絣於木,則以利斧斫治令直,如是,比丘生惡不善念,以善法念治斷滅止。如是,比丘觀內身如身,觀外身如身,立念在身,有知有見,有明有達,是謂:比丘觀身如身。 
  復次,比丘觀身如身:比丘者,齒齒相著,舌逼上齶,以心治心,治斷滅止,猶二力士捉一羸人,處處捉旋,自在打鍛,如是,比丘齒齒相著,舌逼上齶,以心治心,治斷滅止。如是,比丘觀內身如身,觀外身如身,立念在身,有知有見,有明有達,是謂:比丘觀身如身。 
  復次,比丘觀身如身:比丘者,念入息即知念入息,念出息即知念出息,入息長即知入息長,出息長即知出息長,入息短即知入息短,出息短即知出息短,學一切身息入,學一切身息出,學止身行息入,學止口行息出。如是,比丘觀內身如身,觀外身如身,立念在身,有知有見,有明有達,是謂:比丘觀身如身。 
  復次,比丘觀身如身:比丘者,離生喜、樂,漬身潤澤,普遍充滿於此身中,離生喜、樂無處不遍,猶工浴人器盛澡豆,水和成摶,水漬潤澤,普遍充滿無處不周,如是,比丘離生喜、樂,漬身潤澤,普遍充滿於此身中,離生喜、樂,無處不遍。如是,比丘觀內身如身,觀外身如身,立念在身,有知有見,有明有達,是謂:比丘觀身如身。 
  復次,比丘觀身如身:比丘者,定生喜樂,漬身潤澤,普遍充滿,於此身中,定生喜樂,無處不遍,猶如山泉,清淨不濁,充滿流溢,四方水來,無緣得入,即彼泉底,水自涌出,流溢於外,漬山潤澤,普遍充滿,無處不周,如是,比丘定生喜樂,漬身潤澤,普遍充滿,於此身中,定生喜樂,無處不遍。如是,比丘觀內身如身,觀外身如身,立念在身,有知有見,有明有達,是謂:比丘觀身如身。 
  復次,比丘觀身如身:比丘者,無喜生樂,漬身潤澤,普遍充滿,於此身中,無喜生樂,無處不遍,猶青蓮華,紅赤白蓮,水生水長,在於水底,彼根莖華葉,悉漬潤澤,普遍充滿,無處不周,如是,比丘無喜生樂,漬身潤澤,普遍充滿,於此身中,無喜生樂,無處不遍。如是,比丘觀內身如身,觀外身如身,立念在身,有知有見,有明有達,是謂:比丘觀身如身。 
  復次,比丘觀身如身:比丘者,於此身中以清淨心意解遍滿成就遊,於此身中,以清淨心無處不遍,猶有一人,被七肘衣或八肘衣,從頭至足,於其身體無處不覆,如是,比丘於此身中,以清淨心無處不遍。如是,比丘觀內身如身,觀外身如身,立念在身,有知有見,有明有達,是謂:比丘觀身如身。 
  復次,比丘觀身如身:比丘者,念光明想,善受善持,善憶所念,如前後亦然,如後前亦然,如晝夜亦然,如夜晝亦然,如下上亦然,如上下亦然,如是,不顛倒,心無有纏,修光明心,心終不為闇之所覆。如是,比丘觀內身如身,觀外身如身,立念在身,有知有見,有明有達,是謂:比丘觀身如身。 
  復次,比丘觀身如身:比丘者,善受觀相,善憶所念,猶如有人坐觀臥人,臥觀坐人,如是,比丘善受觀相,善憶所念。如是,比丘觀內身如身,觀外身如身,立念在身,有知有見,有明有達,是謂:比丘觀身如身。 
  復次,比丘觀身如身:比丘者,此身隨住,隨其好惡,從頭至足,觀見種種不淨充滿:『我此身中有髮、髦[毛]、爪、齒、麁細薄膚皮、肉、筋、骨、心、腎、肝、肺、大腸、小腸、脾、胃、摶糞、腦及腦根、淚、汗、涕、唾、膿、血、肪、髓、涎、{膽}[痰]、小便。』猶如器盛若干種子,有目之士,悉見分明,謂:稻、粟種、蔓菁、芥子,如是,比丘此身隨住,隨其好惡,從頭至足,觀見種種不淨充滿:『我此身中有髮、髦[毛]、爪、齒、麤細薄膚、皮、肉、筋、骨、心、腎、肝、肺、大腸、小腸、脾、胃、摶糞、腦及腦根、淚、汗、涕、唾、膿、血、肪、髓、涎、痰、小便。』如是,比丘觀內身如身,觀外身如身,立念在身,有知有見,有明有達,是謂:比丘觀身如身。 
  復次,比丘觀身如身:比丘者,觀身諸界:『我此身中有地界、水界、火界、風界、空界、識界。』猶如屠兒殺牛,剝皮布{地於}[於地]上,分作六段,如是,比丘觀身諸界:『我此身中,地界、水界、火界、風界、空界、識界。』如是,比丘觀內身如身,觀外身如身,立念在身,有知有見,有明有達,是謂:比丘觀身如身。 
  復次,比丘觀身如身:比丘者,觀彼死屍,或一、二日……至六、七日,烏鵄所啄,豺狼所食,火燒埋地,悉腐爛壞,見已自比:『今我此身亦復如是,俱有此法,終不得離。』如是,比丘觀內身如身,觀外身如身,立念在身,有知有見,有明有達,是謂:比丘觀身如身。 
  復次,比丘觀身如身:比丘者,如本見息道,骸骨青色,爛腐{食}[餘]半,骨璅在地,見已自比:『今我此身亦復如是,俱有此法,終不得離。』如是,比丘觀內身如身,觀外身如身,立念在身,有知有見,有明有達,是謂:比丘觀身如身。 
  復次,比丘觀身如身:比丘者,如本見息道,離皮肉血,唯筋相連,見已自比:『今我此身亦復如是,俱有此法,終不得離。』如是,比丘觀內身如身,觀外身如身,立念在身,有知有見,有明有達,是謂:比丘觀身如身。
  復次,比丘觀身如身:比丘者,如本見息道,骨節解散,散在諸方,足骨、膞骨、髀骨、髖骨、脊骨、肩骨、頸骨、髑髏骨,各在異處,見已自比:『今我此身亦復如是,俱有此法,終不得離。』如是,比丘觀內身如身,觀外身如身,立念在身,有知有見,有明有達,是謂:比丘觀身如身。 
  復次,比丘觀身如身:比丘者,如本見息道,骨白如螺,青猶鴿色,赤若血塗,腐壞碎粖,見已自比:『今我此身亦復如是,俱有此法,終不得離。』如是,比丘觀內身如身,觀外身如身,立念在身,有知有見,有明有達,是謂:比丘觀身如身。 
  若比丘、比丘尼如是少少觀身如身者,是謂:觀身如身念處。 
  云何觀覺如覺念處?比丘者,覺樂覺時便知覺樂覺;覺苦覺時便知覺苦覺;覺不苦不樂覺時便知覺不苦不樂覺;覺樂身……苦身……不苦不樂身……樂心……苦心……不苦不樂心……樂食……苦食……不苦不樂食……樂無食……苦無食……不苦不樂無食……樂欲……苦欲……不苦不樂欲……樂無欲覺……苦無欲覺……不苦不樂無欲覺時便知覺不苦不樂無欲覺。如是,比丘觀內覺如覺,觀外覺如覺,立念在覺,有知有見,有明有達,是謂:比丘觀覺如覺。若比丘、比丘尼如是少少觀覺如覺者,是謂:觀覺如覺念處。
  云何觀心如心念處?比丘者,有欲心知有欲心如真,無欲心知無欲心如真,有恚無恚……有癡無癡……有穢污無穢污……有合有散……有下有高……有小有大……修不修……定不定……有不解脫心知不解脫心如真,有解脫心知解脫心如真。如是,比丘觀內心如心,觀外心如心,立念在心,有知有見,有明有達,是謂:比丘觀心如心。若有比丘、比丘尼如是,少少觀心如心者,是謂:觀心如心念處。 
  云何觀法如法念處?眼緣色生內結:比丘者,內實有結知內有結如真,內實無結知內無結如真,若未生內結而生者知如真,若已生內結滅不復生者知如真。如是,耳、鼻、舌、身,意緣法生內結:比丘者,內實有結知內有結如真,內實無結知內無結如真,若未生內結而生者知如真,若已生內結滅不復生者知如真。如是,比丘觀內法如法,觀外法如法,立念在法,有知有見,有明有達,是謂:比丘觀法如法,謂:內六處。 
  復次,比丘觀法如法:比丘者,內實有欲知有欲如真,內實無欲知無欲如真,若未生欲而生者知如真,若已生欲滅不復生者知如真。如是,瞋恚、睡眠、掉悔,內實有疑知有疑如真,內實無疑知無疑如真,若未生疑而生者知如真,若已生疑滅不復生者知如真。如是,比丘觀內法如法,觀外法如法,立念在法,有知有見,有明有達,是謂:比丘觀法如法,謂:五蓋也。 
  復次,比丘觀法如法:比丘者,內實有念覺支知有念覺支如真,內實無念覺支知無念覺支如真,若未生念覺支而生者知如真,若已生念覺支便住不忘而不衰退,轉修增廣者知如真。如是,擇法……精進……喜……息……定……比丘者,內實有捨覺支知有捨覺支如真,內實無捨覺支知無捨覺支如真,若未生捨覺支而生者知如真,若已生捨覺支便住不忘而不衰退,轉修增廣者知如真。如是,比丘觀內法如法,觀外法如法,立念在法,有知有見,有明有達,是謂:比丘觀法如法,謂:七覺支。若有比丘、比丘尼如是少少觀法如法者,是謂:觀法如法念處。 
  若有比丘、比丘尼七年立心正住四念處者,彼必得二果,或現法得究竟智,或有餘,得阿那含。置七年,六……五……四……三……二……一年……若有比丘、比丘尼七月立心正住四念處者,彼必得二果,或現法得究竟智,或有餘,得阿那含。置七月,六……五……四……三……二……一月……若有比丘、比丘尼七日七夜立心正住四念處者,彼必得二果,或現法得究竟智,或有餘,得阿那含。置七日七夜,六……五……四……三……二……置一日一夜……若有比丘、比丘尼少少須臾頃立心正住四念處者,彼朝行如是,暮必得昇進;暮行如是,朝必得昇進。」 
  佛說如是,彼諸比丘聞佛所說,歡喜奉行。